The Hiring Managers Role in Recruitment

The recruitment industry is very interesting as there are always 2 parties that need to be considered. What complicates it more is that the 2 parties in question are PEOPLE. There are the candidates and the hiring Manager (+ the Company) . This blog is about the hiring Managers role in the recruitment process.

Yes we have KPI’s for the recruiters and there should be, but why is it not common place to have KPI’s in place for the hiring managers? In most cases it is due to them that the system falls over.

unreliable word cloud

Let me give you an example. We have a client company that we provide a In-House Recruitment function for. The organisation is a largish organisation (approximately 2900 people) and are growing at a phenomenal rate. We have 3 full time and 2 part time recruiters that work with this organisation.

Recently there was a role for a National Sales Manager which was released to the recruitment team. The brief was minimal. Find us someone who can do blah blah and blah who ideally come from these competitor companies or these client companies. We will pay them $150,000-$200,000. That 3 line brief came through on email from the hiring Manager with the closing comment, I want to interview by friday week as I am now on leave for 10 days and can’t be contacted.

Ok, we have 2 weeks, to find the perfect candidate for a 3 line job description.

So, the recruiters did the best they could and gathered a list of 15 good candidates that could all do the tasks specified in the 3 lines and met the salary expectations and either came from strong competitors or prospective client Co’s. They interviewed them all, created a weighted summary report for the hiring manager (so that he could decide who he wanted to interview quickly when he returned from leave) and had the candidates on standby for a quick call to come in for an interview.

The hiring manager returns to work on the Wednesday prior to the friday he wanted to interview. Our recruiters are sure they will get feedback by close of business (COB). COB comes and goes for Wednesday. Thursday, the recruiter in charge, drops by his office. “Jack”, can you please let me know which of the candidates you would like to meet tomorrow? “Yes, Yes! I will get that done in the next hour”. COB comes for Thursday, no information from the hiring Manager. Friday comes and goes, no information. The following week comes. COB Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday come and go, no information despite consistent reminders. This goes on for 5 weeks!

Now keep in mind, that all these candidates are $150,000-$200,000 people, and they are all from competitive companies or end users of this organisations services. Luckily the recruiter had the foresight after week 2 to contact all of the candidates and tell them the role was on hold.

Week 6 comes, and an email turns up saying “I want to interview candidates 1,3,8,10 and 11 from 8am through to 1pm on friday next week (week 7 from when he returned from leave) for an hour each. So the recruiter tries to organise the interviews. Candidate 3 & 11 have accepted other jobs and candidate 1 isn’t interested in working with/for someone who is this disorganised. The hiring Manager is left with candidate 8 & 10, who happen to be the least qualified of the 5 candidates put forward. The recruiter advises the hiring Manager, who is now blaming the Recruiter for not managing the candidates. WHAT, its 8 weeks since we interviewed them!

End result, no appointment was made and more importantly, the damage that was done to the brand was in the market was devastating.

This is a true story. But what could of happened differently? If the management team had a set of KPI’s that they were measured on that were fed back to the CEO then maybe, just maybe they would take this a little more seriously. All they have to do is care about the people who they are trying to attract.

Its unfortunate but I can guarantee you that the hiring Manager in question will not be reading this post as recruitment is such a small part of his responsibility (in his mind). However if he did, I would like to ask a question.

arrogant

“What makes you think you are more important that the people you are hiring that allows¬†you to treat them with such disrespect? Why would anyone want to work for you? And then consider that these candidates are competitors, past and maybe future clients you are dealing with! Seriously?”

There are very few “excellent” candidates out there. You never know when you will come across one. So treat them all with the respect they deserve. At the end of every recruitment process, even if they have missed out on the role, you want them to be saying, “I want to work with her/him!”

IHRG Logo 600 DPI

Author: Steve Begg, MD The In-House Recruitment Group

Advertisements